Food For A Year

Library of information and resources for the "Indigo" generation.
Calculate your food needs

This form should give you an idea of the volume of food you may need. You will need to use your own judgment when making decisions as to how much food to buy. 50 pounds of oats can work wonders in the right hands, but if your limited to making oatmeal it will seem silly to buy so much. Something that may experts say: Buy and store the kind of food that you will eat.

Use the following calculator to figure the minimum food storage amounts for your family for a year. These are only recommendations.You will need to determine the needs of your own family.


Link to Calculator: http://www.containerandpackaging.com/food_storage_calculator.asp
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

Food Storage

FOUR FACTORS THAT AFFECT FOOD STORAGE

Factor #1: The Temperature

Temperature has more to do with how long well dried foods store than anything else. The USDA states, "Each 5.6oC. (10.08oF) drop in temperature doubles the storage life of the seeds". Obviously, there is a limit as to how far this statement can be taken. However I expect it basically holds true from room temperature down to freezing. No doubt, the inverse could also be considered true. "Each 5.6oC. (10.08oF) rise in temperature halves the storage life of seeds." This theory holds true for non-garden seeds as well.

Factor #2: Product Moisture Content

By looking at the USDA nutritional tables, dry beans, grains, and flours contain an average of 10% moisture. Although it is very difficult and unnecessary to remove all moisture from dry foods, it is imperative that any food be stored as dry as possible. Foods with excess moisture can spoil right in their containers. This is an important consideration when packing food with dry ice as moisture condenses and freezes on the outer surface of the dry ice. For long term storage, grains should have a moisture content of 10% or less. It is difficult to accurately measure this without special equipment.

Factor #3: Atmosphere the product is stored in

Foods packed in air don't store as well as in oxygen free gasses. This is because air contains oxygen which oxidizes many of the compounds in food. Food storage companies have a couple of different processes for removing the oxygen:

Displacing the oxygen: This is done by purging out all the air in the product with an inert gas. Nitrogen is almost always used because it is the most inert gas known. People doing their own packing occasionally use dry ice which gives off carbon dioxide gas, and probably works just about as well.

Absorb the oxygen: Oxygen absorber packets do just that. Air contains about 78% nitrogen and 21% oxygen, leaving about 1% for the other gasses. If the oxygen is absorbed, what remains is 99% pure nitrogen in a partial vacuum.

If oxygen absorber packets are used, care must be taken to use a storage container that can stand some vacuum. As air is sucked into your container as the oxygen is absorbed, it reintroduces more oxygen that must be absorbed. Before long, the oxygen absorbers will have absorbed all the oxygen they can. Obviously, your product won't be oxygen free under these circumstances. Walton Feed gets around this problem with their plastic Super Pail buckets by purging the product first with nitrogen before tossing in the two oxygen absorber packets. This way the absorbers have little or no oxygen to absorb and don't create a vacuum within the pail. As cans work well under a partial vacuum, purging them with nitrogen isn't necessary before inserting the oxygen absorber packet and sealing the lid. Large seeds store better in nitrogen. On the other hand, small seeds, like many garden seeds store better in air. For this reason Walton cans their garden seed packs in air.

Factor #4: The container the product is stored in

To get the best storage life out of your product it must have a hermetic (air tight) seal. Containers that do this well are:

#10 Cans
Sealable food storage buckets
Sealable food quality metal or plastic drums

Whatever container you use, be sure it is food grade as your product can be tainted with whatever the container is made from. Plastic sacks are not good air tight containers, for even if they are sealed, the relatively thin plastic 'breathes,' allowing air to pass through. Paper sacks are of course even worse.

There is some concern as to how good a seal is made by the lids on plastic buckets used by food storage companies. Manufacturer studies show an extremely small amount of air transfer. This amount is so small, however, that it can be considered a hermetic seal. It has also been found that the lids can be re-used several times without dramatically degrading the performance of the seal.

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/Hollys.html
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

good idea thanks xxx

I've been trying to get 5kg of pasta a week, but my mum cooks its up and stores it in the fridge in mass and eats it a lot! and then gives whatever is over to neighbors etc, so its impossible grrr!
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

Oh, in regards to meat, there is a way to store that for a few days without fridges etc. I was thinking about building a kind of dry well and covering it up and storing meat in it, that way the further down the dry well it goes the colder it would be. But thats the method I would use. hehe
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

I heard because of floods worldwide in many countries wheat is going to be a shortage, in UK we're being scared that fuel will be a shortage, in both petrol, gas and electricity!
Now because of the bees a honey shortage and ofcourse new studies show that you can get BSE from cows milk, and BSE is apparantly on the come back!
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

Not many people in my area would have the same idea as I would to go looking for wild food in the local woodlands I have here. The people in my area are too urban that even their kids dont know that potatos grow underground or that lamb chops means dead sheep. In fact this is a real concern that the government has put on the television recently, thousands of kids accross London, dont know those basic things!
I have an adepth knowledge of British and North European forest survival, I have even in the past ate wood for practise of true faminine times, and although its a long time of chewing and being careful when you swallow, it is very filling quite quickly and doesnt give you much problems when you go to the toilet later, like you would think.
Tina xxx
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

If the worse came to the worse I do have a tiny food supply in my garden.

We have a fig tree, which has lots of fruit we never tend to eat. We have a bay tree, a massive rosemary bush, and a new one sprouting, and a section where we grow red onions and strawberries.
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

Oh, and I would also like to say that I have in the past attempted to eat ants, and I would again. hehe
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

Where I live we have plenty of Acorns, Minor’s Lettuce, Dandelion, Pine Seeds, Squirrels, Wild Turkey, Pheasant, Deer, Trout, and so on…

I shoot the Digger Squirrels that destroy my garden, and then feed them to the Coyotes, Hawks, and Turkey Buzzards, but in desperation we could make a good Mulligan Stew with them. We also feed trout that don’t survive when we “catch and release” to the Bald Eagles, and Osprey. We use the fish heads from the Trout we clean in our fly traps.

A very nutritious garden food that grows just about all year long is Kale, and it even still grows under snow., and speaking of snow, do not forget Potatoes. All your tuber crops if stored in cool dry sand will last all winter. You can buy bags of sand used for children’s sand boxes that’s good and clean, or if you have a river or ocean near by you can get that sand and clean it up.

I’m always talking with my friends about a good root cellar. I might have to build one, one of these days.

I’m off to move two cubic (+) yards of organic fertilizer (cow sh!t).
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

Oh hell. I'd hate to waste all that time preparing for the end of the world, only to find that the end of the world never comes. I always feel kind of bad when survivalists spend their lives stockpiling food and ammunition, only to kick the bucket before armageddon... all that preparation for nothing. I always think "they should have spent that money on beer or something." :-(
User avatar
UntoldGlory
 
Posts: 2655
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:38 am
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 120 times

Speaking of which, anyone think we should be stockpiling kegs of beer in our basements, just in case the religious right takes over the country and declares another prohibition?
User avatar
UntoldGlory
 
Posts: 2655
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:38 am
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 120 times

by Maarten
[QUOTE=UntoldGlory;105162]Oh hell. I'd hate to waste all that time preparing for the end of the world, only to find that the end of the world never comes. I always feel kind of bad when survivalists spend their lives stockpiling food and ammunition, only to kick the bucket before armageddon... all that preparation for nothing. I always think "they should have spent that money on beer or something." :-([/QUOTE]

for sure. i totally agree with stockp[iling beer aswell. If the world is going down a years supply of food wont do any good, muight aswell spend ur last moments with a nice cold beer.
User avatar
Maarten
 
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Mar 21, 2008 9:08 pm
Has thanked: 1 time
Been thanked: 14 times

Great idea, Lavella! We could control the world's beer reserves the way the establishment currently controls the world's oil supply. With control of the booze, we could make all of humanity do our bidding.... except those pesky teetotaling Baptists :(
User avatar
UntoldGlory
 
Posts: 2655
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2008 2:38 am
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 120 times

on friday night I discussed with my mum about my concerns regarding food and was suprised she shared the concerns to the point she really wants to move to a place with a larger garden for vegetable growing reasons... however dad isnt complying to the idea.

So, mum made a compromise with dad... shes removing his 25ft by 9ft pond out of the garden soon.
Shes dug out a large area of our current patio yesterday and I helped her, and we have bought and planted... A mature Bramley apple tree... 2 blueberry bushes... more rhubarb, in fact 12 of them... 15 beef tomato seedlings... 2 cherry tomatos matured... 12 strawberry plants... 12 rockets... 12 spinach... and we are going to buy a plum tree, peach tree and cherry tree soon.
Though mum is concerned that it is seasonal.

Though it is also illegal in UK to own a gun, mum seriously wants to apply for a license to own one because she feels in the future it will be neccessary... I never knew my mum had these feelings and veiws before and we've found some common ground lately, over it.
She also regrets getting rid of the dog, and is considering another one, preferably large enough to help us defend the food in the garden. She wants to move because she feels it's neccessary to get a good supply of eggs from owning chickens again too, but in our current area we cannot do that.
Shes also buy 3, 5 litre bottles of water a week to keep by!
Tina xx
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

Hi Tina,

With all those new fruit trees you need to look into a food dehydrator. You can also dry fruit in a green house, but what you’re looking for is air circulation along with the heat. I have friends who use drying racks over their wood stove, which I also intend to build this year. We currently use an electric food dehydrator. My personal favorite is dried pears.

Plum trees are easy to grow and take care of, but you might want to research some of the other fruit trees. Peaches can have some real problems with pest (without pesticides), and cherries really get eaten up by the birds (without netting).
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

I like dried mangos but cant grow them here in UK hehe *blush*
User avatar
TheRavenMother
 
Posts: 6829
Joined: Sun Apr 29, 2007 2:02 am
Has thanked: 198 times
Been thanked: 141 times

I really like dried mango also.

At my childhood home in Southern California we had all kinds of fruit trees, along with chickens. My grandfather even had a milk cow at one point. I really miss all the Mediterranean fruits and nuts; avocados, apricots, loquats, olives, walnuts, bananas, pomegranates, figs, oranges, and so on.

My current climate is good for apples, plumbs, peaches, cherries, and other fruits that need cold winters.

At my winter Mexican home on the Caribbean I had a different selection of wild jungle fruits, my favorite being papaya. I really like fresh coconut, but there was way too much of it. If you cut open the young coconuts, the meat was very sweet and almost jelly like, and of course the milk was a good source of water on long deserted beach walks. With a machete, hook on a stick (for lobster and octopus), dive mask, fishing tackle, spear gun, and some flint for fire, you could feed yourself very well there. The way to catch a ton of fish with a casting net is to chum first with some chopped up fish (especially around a cenote; underground stream that comes up in the ocean near the shoreline). Then it’s time to dry the fish after soaking it in a brine solution with spices. I also really like a good seviche (raw seafood soaked with citric acids) served on a fresh tortilla.

Image
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

There’s no way I would be in Mexico during a North American crises. Down there they’ll chase off the gringos, and the ones left behind will either be imprisoned, or hacked up with machetes. After 9/11 they were glad to see any gringos that were there to spend money, but when money and food get tight, and their economy goes under, the gringos will be the first scapegoats, then the Maya will turn on the Mexicans (which they have done before).

When the world reaches it’s resources crises, you don’t want to be in the minority in your community. Historically the ones in the minority are the first to go, such as the elites, ethnic minorities, and religious minorities.

If you haven’t been doing it yet, make yourself known within your community by attending community meetings, and let people get use to seeing your face. If you’re a stranger, even within your own community, you will be seen as a threat.
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

I do attend meetings with community leaders here, and the subject of resource raids has come up.

I think if you’re too isolated there could be problems, and if you’re too close to a resource hungry metro area there could be problems.

I have a friend (who worked for Dick Cheney, and then protested everything about him) that says all the want-a-be Morlocks (people living underground) will all be killed during the coming earth changes. According to James there are underground cities all over the U.S., and because of earthquakes and such, they will be the most dangerous places to be (crushed or buried alive).
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times

I would say flexibility and adaptability are anybody’s greatest assets. Keeping an eye on the writing on the wall is important, and having provisions to meet contingencies is also good, but it’s the things you can’t plan for that require the most skills.

Personally if you were to say our lives are chosen, in some ways I’m actually looking forward to the coming challenges.

Every so often I will experience flashes of future events. I often see major earthquakes in my current area, and one time I saw a bunch of children in my kitchen all shaken up by a earthquake, as I just stood back and laughed to myself.

I had a girlfriend in college who would always say, “Why was I born now, in this place?,” referring to what she saw as a problem world that was going to get really bad. I can imagine souls like Putin and Bush coming to this world to work out war issues, but I have to wonder about all the souls that participate (unwillingly?) in major catastrophes.
Thomas James Haller
 
Posts: 419
Joined: Tue Jul 10, 2007 4:38 am
Has thanked: 9 times
Been thanked: 7 times


  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Return to index page Information & Resources

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests
cron