#2
I think Illumi and Dabbs are the only posters with actual Masonic connections (Dabbs is a member of the Eastern Star women's organization). I'm what you might call a "cowan and an eavesdropper" - I've read a lot of Masonic material and know quite a bit about the organization, but I haven't taken the plunge and joined a local Lodge yet.

#3
hmm, id like to know whats its like from an insiders perspective

i wonder how i would be recieved if i just showed up at the local hall

#4
From what I understand, most Masonic lodges are open to visitors during certain times, although you will not be allowed to participate in any of their meetings until you are a member. Generally speaking, you'll be introduced to members of the lodge's leadership and you can then ask questions and let them know if you're interested in becoming a member. In the old days, you had to be "sponsored" by a member of the lodge, so becoming a member will be that much easier if you form relationships with Masons in your community. However, from what I have read, it is now becoming relatively common for interested parties to request membership without knowing somone in the Lodge. You'll probably go through some kind of probationary period then, to give the Lodge members a chance to get to know you, and they'll want to conduct an interview with you (usually at your house), which is standard procedure for all new members. If you have a Masonic lodge in your community, I would recommend giving them a call and asking when the W.M. or another member of the Lodge's leadership would be available to answer your questions and discuss membership with you. One thing to keep in mind is that, contrary to the conspiracy literature, Masonry is really not that secretive; expect to find a group of men who like to have a good time and who are open to newcomers joining their Craft.

#5
[QUOTE=UntoldGlory;341802]From what I understand, most Masonic lodges are open to visitors during certain times, although you will not be allowed to participate in any of their meetings until you are a member. Generally speaking, you'll be introduced to members of the lodge's leadership and you can then ask questions and let them know if you're interested in becoming a member. In the old days, you had to be "sponsored" by a member of the lodge, so becoming a member will be that much easier if you form relationships with Masons in your community. However, from what I have read, it is now becoming relatively common for interested parties to request membership without knowing somone in the Lodge. You'll probably go through some kind of probationary period then, to give the Lodge members a chance to get to know you, and they'll want to conduct an interview with you (usually at your house), which is standard procedure for all new members. If you have a Masonic lodge in your community, I would recommend giving them a call and asking when the W.M. or another member of the Lodge's leadership would be available to answer your questions and discuss membership with you. One thing to keep in mind is that, contrary to the conspiracy literature, Masonry is really not that secretive; expect to find a group of men who like to have a good time and who are open to newcomers joining their Craft.[/QUOTE]

hmm, this is helpful thank you :) whats holding you back from joining?

#6
I plan to join eventually, but I'm not certain how my family or church would react, given the 'sinister' reputation Masonry has in many people's minds. I'm waiting for the right opportunity, when I'm comfortable in joining without causing a huge stir and instigating melodrama :)

#10
On the positive side, if your family aren't rabid fundamentalists, you could try pointing out all of the *positive* things that Masons do, like running hospitals for child burn victims, providing charitable relief for the poor, etc.

#14
Same here. Some Protestant churches are more open to Masonry than others, though. For instance, the conservative Southern Baptist Conference is generally cool with its members (and even its pastors) becoming Freemasons. Others, like the Lutheran Church, have longstanding bans on Masonic membership.

Here's a great resource for information on Masonry, including some of the various charges that have been brought against the organization by conspiracy nutters: Anti-Masonry: Points of View

They also have some info on membership, Lodge activities, etc.

#16
Sorry for the disturbance but I what to join too. But, I don't know if they let me join in because my disabilities. Would they let you in on that? Hey, it is worth asking and looking for nice people that care about me and I will care about them.

It is good that your thinking about joining Joe. ;)

#17
i read that so long as it doesnt cause anyone any harm or discomfort, they used to reject people for physical disabilities but they dont anymore

#18
[QUOTE=Joe;341822]i read that so long as it doesnt cause anyone any harm or discomfort, they used to reject people for physical disabilities but they dont anymore[/QUOTE]

Well that is good Joe. ;) Are they at every community and I have to look it up?

Return to “General Cafe”

cron